ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF GLYCYRRHIZA GLABRA AND ITS COMBINATION WITH ANTIBIOTICS

  • A. R. SUTHAR P. J. VYAS A. R. SUTHAR AND P. J. VYAS DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY, SHETH M.N.SCIENCE COLLEGE, PATAN, GUJARAT, INDIA. Corresponding author’s e-mail: vyaspiyushj@yahoo.com
Keywords: Antibacterial activity, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Antibiotics.

Abstract

Antibiotics  are  widely  used  for  treatment  of  various  infectious  diseases,  but
wide use of antibiotic has led to the emergence and spread of resistant strains.
Plants  contain  various  phytochemicals  with  promising  biological  activities.
Studies  of  synergistic  effect  of  plant  extracts  with  antibiotics  have  been
reported.  In  this  study,  antibacterial  activity  of  Glycyrrhiza  glabra  and  its
combination with erythromycin, ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime were carried out
against  E.coli  and  S.aureus.  Combination  of  methanol  extract  with
erythromycin showed good promising activity  against E.coli. This concept of
combination  of  plant  extract  with  antibiotics  may  be  new  way  to  treat
infectious diseases.
There  are  number  of  different  types  of  chemicals  are  produced  by  various
medicinal plants and their healing potential has been known for thousands of
years  1 . Plants are source of various antimicrobial agents. Plant materials play
vital role to maintain basic health needs in the world. Due to the side effects
and  the  resistance  that  pathogenic  microorganisms  build  against  antibiotics,
recently  much  attention  has  been  paid  to  extracts  and  biologically  active
compounds isolated from plant species used in herbal medicine  2 .  
Various  microorganisms  are  developing  resistance  against  antibiotics  due  to
wide uses of them. One way to fight against such resistance problem is use of
combination  therapy  of  plant  extracts  with  antibiotics.  The  combination  of
antibiotics  and  plant  extracts  is  a  novel  concept  and  it  could  be  effective  3 .
Many studies on synergistic effect of plant extracts and antibiotics have been
reported.

In this study we have performed antibacterial activity of methanol extract of Glycyrrhiza glabra alone and
its combination with antibiotics against bacteria.
Glycyrrhiza glabra is a traditional medicinal herb grows in the various parts of the world.  Its scientific
name is taken from the Greek for sweet root (glykys, meaning sweet, and rhiza, meaning root)  4 . It has
been used medicinally in both Western and Eastern countries for more than 4000 years  5, 6 . Different types
of constituents have been isolated from G. glabra, including a water-soluble, biologically active complex
that accounts for 40-50 % of total dry material weight. This complex is composed of triterpene saponins,
flavonoids,  polysaccharides,  pectins,  simple  sugars,  amino  acids,  mineral  salts,  and  various  other
substances
7
. Glycyrrhiza glabra is the most commonly useful for treatment of upper respiratory ailments
including coughs, hoarseness, sore throat and bronchitis  8, 9 .

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