TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE AND BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION IN THE PANCHMAHALS DISTRICT, GUJARAT, INDIA

  • P. K. PATEL DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY, S.P.T. ARTS AND SCIENCE COLLEGE, GODHRA, GUJARAT, INDIA.
Keywords: Conservation, Ethnomedicine, Gujarat, Indigenous knowledge.

Abstract

Traditional knowledge is the essence of social capital of the poor people and
plays  a  significant  role  in  conservation  of  biodiversity.  Local  culture,  spirit,
social and ethical norms possessed by local people has often been determining
factors  for  sustainable  use,  and  conservation  of  biodiversity.  Local  people
believe that the Sylvan deities would be offended if trees are cut and twigs,
flowers,  fruits,  etc.  are  plucked.  These  groves  are  considered  as  one  of  the
most species-rich areas for plants, birds and mammals.
The  paper  deals  with  use  of  certain  indigenous  medicinal  plants  among  the
local people of the Panchmahals District, Gujarat. The study highlighted the
use of 16 plant species as herbal medicine in the treatment of various ailments.
It is of utmost necessity to take up ex-situ cultivation and conservation of these
medicinal plant species. Plant name, local name, family, along with their parts
used,  ethnobotanical  application  with  active  principles  and  conservation
strategies are discussed.

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